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Thyme

These long-cultivated herbs are also widely popular for their ornamental characteristics, drought tolerance and ability to withstand moderate foot traffic.  

 

Available in 4" (10 cm ) pots only. We currently grow: 
Thymus pseudolanuginosus (Woolly Thyme)
Thymus serphyllum 'Albus' (White Creeping Thyme)
Thymus serphyllum 'Coccineus' (Red Creeping Thyme)
Thymus serphyllum 'Elfin' (Elfin Thyme)
Companions for Thyme
Woolly Thyme
Thymus pseudolanuginosus or T. praecox var. arcticus

 

Height         1-2 inches (3-5 cm)

Spread        12-18 inches (30-45 cm) 

Flower         Pale pink

Blooming     Summer

Hardiness    Zone 4-9

Light           Full sun to light shade

Moisture      Average to dry

Soil             Well-drained 

 

Remarkable for its dense carpeting habit and densely grey-haired 1/4" long leaves, this evergreen thyme is well suited to filling in around flagstones, spilling over rocks or edging walkways in full sun. Pale pink flowers appear close to the foliage throughout summer. Will tolerate moderate foot traffic. Not as edible as the other cultivars. All thyme species support bees and small native pollinators.

 

Recommendations for growing Woolly Thyme

Thyme performs best in a neutral to slightly acidic soil of average to poor fertility. Regardless of texture, the site must be well-drained at all times, particularly in the winter or rot will occur. This is why thyme is best suited to sandy or gravelly soils, as hardscape filler plantings, as screenings and thin soils in stonework cracks aid in drainage. Water well once planted but only as needed after that. Avoid mulching plants if possible. Thyme is not aggressive enough to smother all weeds, but easy to weed around; they re-establish quickly from light disturbance. Plants can suffer occasionally from aphids. Maintenance of established plantings can include shearing after flowering or rejuvenation of older, woodier crowns by division.

 
 
White Flowering Thyme
Thymus serphyllum 'Albus' or T. praecox 'Alba'

 

Height         2-3 inches (5-7 cm)

Spread        12-18 inches (30-45 cm) 

Flower         Pale pink

Blooming     Summer

Hardiness    Zone 3-8

Light           Full sun

Moisture      Average to dry

Soil             Well-drained 

 

Often requested, white-flowering thyme is an alternative design choice to the standard pink-flowering creeping thyme. Moderate to fast grower, grow in full sun to maintain tightest growth habit. Leaves are a more vibrant green than other thymes we grow. Well suited to herb gardens, filling in around flagstones, spilling over rocks or edging walkways. All thyme species support bees and small native pollinators.

 

Recommendations for growing Creeping Thyme

Thyme performs best in a neutral to slightly acidic soil of average to poor fertility. Regardless of texture, the site must be well-drained at all times, particularly in the winter or rot will occur. This is why thyme is best suited to sandy or gravelly soils, as hardscape filler plantings, as screenings and thin soils in stonework cracks aid in drainage. Water well once planted but only as needed after that. Avoid mulching plants if possible. Thyme is not aggressive enough to smother all weeds, but easy to weed around; they re-establish quickly from light disturbance. Plants can suffer occasionally from aphids. Maintenance of established plantings can include shearing after flowering or rejuvenation of older, woodier crowns by division.

Red Creeping Thyme
Thymus serphyllum 'Coccineus' or T. praecox

 

Also called mother of thyme, wild thyme

Height         2-3 inches (5-7 cm)

Spread        12-24 inches (30-60 cm) 

Flower         Dark pink

Blooming     Summer

Hardiness    Zone 2-8

Light           Full sun

Moisture      Average to dry

Soil             Well-drained 

 

The most popular and widely used creeping thyme for its vibrant pink flowers, moderately fast growth rate and easy care. 1/4" long leaves and dense growth habit are very effective between paving stones, along walkways, around stonework and in the herb garden. This species is useful for edible gardens as well, and attracts bees and native pollinators.

 

Recommendations for growing Creeping Thyme

Thyme performs best in a neutral to slightly acidic soil of average to poor fertility. Regardless of texture, the site must be well-drained at all times, particularly in the winter or rot will occur. This is why thyme is best suited to sandy or gravelly soils, as hardscape filler plantings, as screenings and thin soils in stonework cracks aid in drainage. Water well once planted but only as needed after that. Avoid mulching plants if possible. Thyme is not aggressive enough to smother all weeds, but easy to weed around; they re-establish quickly from light disturbance. Plants can suffer occasionally from aphids. Maintenance of established plantings can include shearing after flowering or rejuvenation of older, woodier crowns by division.

 
 
Elfin Thyme
Thymus serphyllum 'Elfin'

 

Height         1-2 inches (3-5 cm)

Spread        12-18 inches (30-45 cm) 

Flower         Pink

Blooming     Summer

Hardiness    Zone 3-8

Light           Full sun

Moisture      Average to dry

Soil             Well-drained 

 

One of our favourite selections of creeping thyme, 'Elfin' is an even smaller, more compact cultivar with shell pink flowers in early summer. It's growth habit tends to mound and billow more than white or red creeping thyme, and is very effective around hardscapes or as a small-scale lawn substitute. Very drought tolerant once established. Foliage is also edible and flowers attracts pollinators.

 

Recommendations for growing Elfin Thyme

Thyme performs best in a neutral to slightly acidic soil of average to poor fertility. Regardless of texture, the site must be well-drained at all times, particularly in the winter or rot will occur. This is why thyme is best suited to sandy or gravelly soils, as hardscape filler plantings, as screenings and thin soils in stonework cracks aid in drainage. Water well once planted but only as needed after that. Avoid mulching plants if possible. Thyme is not aggressive enough to smother all weeds, but easy to weed around; they re-establish quickly from light disturbance. Plants can suffer occasionally from aphids. Maintenance of established plantings can include shearing after flowering or rejuvenation of older, woodier crowns by division.

Companions for Thyme
 

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